Restoration Style (1660–1685)

Restoration Style, also known as Carolean style, was very popular in England, during the restoration of Charles II monarchy .

Portrait of Charles II, old picture

image source: https://www.biography.com/.image/t_share/MTE5NTU2MzE1OTMyNDI3Nzg3/charles-ii-39462-1-402.jpg

History of Carolean Style

Restoration style, also known as Carolean style (from the Latin “Carolus” (Charles), refers to the decorative arts popular in England from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 to the late 1680s after Charles II (reigned 1660–1685). The return of the king and his court from exile on the Continent led to the replacement of the Puritan severity of the Cromwellian style with a taste for magnificence and opulence and to the introduction of Dutch and French artistic influences.

info source: http://www.museumfurniture.com/english/

info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_style

Charles II portrait bust, Honor Pelle, 1684

image source: http://www.vam.ac.uk/__data/assets/image/0012/222024/239-1881_charles_II_bust_1000px_custom_290x355_06200760.jpg

Restoration period Masterpieces

  • Squerryes Court in Westerham, Kent, a beautiful mansion, of red brick, seems to have been built a few years before A.D. 1686. This estate was made for Sir Nicholas Crisp, Baronet, who purchased Squerryes in A.D. 1680. It is typical of the kind of manor house which was developed in the Restoration period.
  • Ham House in Richmond. It was extended and remodelled in the 1670s by Murray’s daughter, Elizabeth and her second husband John Maitland, Duke of Lauderdale. Their architect was William Samwell. The interiors are richly decorated with baroque ceiling murals by Antonio Verrio.
  • Windsor Castle, which was remodelled. Charles II appointed the architect Hugh May to supervise the modernisation of the Royal Apartments, which became the grandest baroque State Apartments in England. The rich appearance of his new interiors was heightened by expensive textiles and magnificent tapestries, which, in order to preserve their colour, were only exposed when the King and Queen were in residence.

info source: http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.016%20-%201886/016-10.pdf

info source: https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/visit/windsorcastle/about/who-built-the-castle

info source: http://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/place/ham-house

St George’s Hall, Windsor Castle, 1819

image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_May#/media/File:St_George%27s_Hall_Windsor_from_W.H._Payne%27s_Royal_Residences_(1819).jpg

What were the main features of Restoration style?

  • CURVING FORMS

Flowing, curvaceous forms were characteristic of the Restoration style. Elaborate carving and high-relief decoration created a sense of movement that was gracefully contained within the symmetry of the overall design.

  • RICH FINISHES

Ornate, rich finishes were very popular. Gold and silver was used to embellish wood and leather panels.

  • SPIRAL COLUMNS

In the mid-17th century a new technique of producing spirally twisted forms by turning the wood on a lathe was developed. This was used to create supports for furniture and architectural woodwork.

  • NATURAL MOTIFS

Fruit, flowers and leaves had long been used to decorate objects. In the 17th century, however, a growing interest in botany led to the creation of increasingly realistic natural motifs.

  • ACANTHUS LEAVES

The acanthus leaf is a motif that features in many styles. Its scrolling growth made it particularly popular in the Restoration period. The leaves were used as a band of decoration around objects, as architectural features or to create flowing, ornamental forms.

info source: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/s/style-guide-restoration/

Table and Candlestands, about 1640-1680

image source: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/s/style-guide-restoration/