Eco-Design (1990s-Today)

Eco-Design is based on the consideration for the enviromental  impacts of the product during its whole lifecycle. It searches for new building solutions that are environment-friendly and lead to a reduction in the consumption of materials and energy.

Eco Friendly House
Eco Friendly House

Image source: https://it.pinterest.com/

 

Eco design- Architecture

  • In terms of energy: significant reduction in heating and cooling requirements, energy gain optimization, power consumption limitation (lighting and ventilation management, efficient equipment).
  • In terms of upkeep-maintenance: choice of materials, equipment and implementation requiring limited upkeep, facilitating maintenance and promoting long life for the entire site.
  • In terms of overall cost: take into account direct and indirect costs, the increase in energy costs as well as the impact on health and the environment. Only 20% of the overall cost of a building relates to construction, 80% is due to its operation (maintenance and consumption).

Environment-Friendly Building:


  • By integrating the building into its environment: bioclimatic architecture (orientation, compactness, passive management of weather constraints) taking into account architectural issues, stormwater management, improvement in cycle paths, consideration of site characteristics (specific risks, meteorology).
  • By reducing CO2 emissions and the impact on the planet: choice of low embodied energy construction materials derived from natural and renewable resources, rainwater recovery, production of renewable energy.
  • By reducing the nuisances of the construction site and activity: discharge limitation (dust, wastewater, etc.), noise abatement, waste sorting and recovery.

Info source: http://ecoconception.oree.org/EN/eco-construction-and-eco-design.html

 

Examples

Taipei World Financial Center
Taipei World Financial Center

Taipei 101  known as the Taipei World Financial Center – is a landmark supertall skyscraper in Xinyi District, Taipei, Taiwan. In 2011, the building was awarded the LEED platinum certification, the highest award according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system, and became the tallest and largest green building in the world.

The building was architecturally created as a symbol of the evolution of technology and Asian tradition.  The tower is designed to withstand typhoons and earthquakes.

Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipei_101

 

Findhorn Ecovillage  is an experimental architectural community project based at The Park, in Moray, Scotland, near the village of Findhorn. The project’s main aim is to demonstrate a sustainable development in environmental, social, and economic terms. Work began in the early 1980s under the auspices of the Findhorn Foundation but now includes a wide diversity of organisations and activities. Numerous different ecological techniques are in use.

Living Machine

In 1995 Jonathon Porritt opened Europe’s first Living Machine (also known as Eco-Restorers in The UK) at The Park campus. This is an ecologically engineered waste water treatment system which is designed to treat sewage from a population of up to 350 people and in common with a number of other such systems also provides a research and educational facility to promote the technology. The invention of Canadian scientist John Todd, they use tanks containing diverse communities of bacteria, algae, micro-organisms, numerous species of plants and trees, snails, fish and other living creatures to treat the water. At the end of the series of tanks, the resulting water is pure enough to be returned to the local water table. Plans to use the water for irrigation have been considered but not implemented to date.

Living Machine, Findhorn Ecovillage
Living Machine, Findhorn Ecovillage

Info and image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Findhorn_Ecovillage

 

Eco design- Furniture

  • VOC: Volatile Organic Compound. These are chemicals that off-gas into the air – some of which have harmful long-term health effects.
  • Upholstery: upholstered goods made with natural latex foam wrapped in organic wool. Natural latex is made from collected sap from rubber trees — it’s an organic by product that does not off-gas harmful toxins.
  • Wood Furniture: furniture made from solid wood such as walnut, teak, oak or maple. Wood furniture is typically held together by basic wood joinery techniques, ensuring a stronger bond and requiring less adhesives, which are the main culprits in harmful VOC emissions.
  • Rugs: Choose natural fibers such as wool, cotton, or jute over synthetics.  Wool is naturally fire retardant unlike its artificial counterparts, which are prone to igniting more easily.  Wool absorbs moisture and captures dust or pollen, thus reducing humidity and allergens in the air.

Info source: http://www.nicheinteriors.com/green-interior-design/

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Image source: http://interiorideas.fishwen.com/eco-interior-design/

 

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