Glasgow School (1870-1910)

Glasgow School was founded in Glasgow, Scotland, during the 1870s. Representives groups included The Four, the Glasgow Girls and the Glasgow Boys. The Glasgow School of Art was the centre of this movement, designed by  Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Glasgow School of Art, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh
Glasgow School of Art, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_art


The Four

The painter Margaret MacDonald, the architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh, MacDonald’s sister Frances and Herbert McNair were also known as The Four or the Spook School; they defined Glasgow Style.

Glasgow School Furniture
Glasgow School Furniture

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, (1868-1928), Scottish architect and designer who was prominent in the Arts and Crafts Movement in Great Britain. His chief architectural projects were the Glasgow School of Art (1896–1909), considered the first original example of Art Nouveau architecture in Great Britain; two unrealized projects—the 1901 International exhibition, Glasgow (1898), and “Haus eines Kunstfreundes” (1901); Windyhill, Kilmacolm (1899–1901), and Hill House, Helensburgh (1902); the Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow (1904); and Scotland Street School (1904–06).

Info source: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Charles-Rennie-Mackintosh#ref51348


 Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow (1904)
Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow (1904)

Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willow_Tearooms

Margaret MacDonald (1864-1933) Skilled in a variety of media such as watercolour, metalwork, embroidery and textiles. Frances, Margaret’s sister, was her first collaborator resulting in an ambitious venture, the opening of the MacDonald Sisters Studio in the 1890s. Together they produced innovative work, with both their styles drawing inspiration from Celtic imagery, literature, symbolism and folklore.

Info source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/arts/margaret_macdonald_the_talented_other_half_of_charles_rennie_mackintosh.shtml

Frances MacDonald  (1873–1921) her painting is based on her intimate understanding of fhe landscape.

Info source: http://www.francesmacdonald.co.uk/

James Herbert MacNair (1868 – 1955), was a Scottish artist, designer and teacher, one of pioneer of Glasgow Style; he produced furniture, book illustrations, water colours and posters.

James Herbert Macnair Folding chair, 1890
James Herbert Macnair
Folding chair, 1890

Image Source: http://www.artnet.com/artists/james-herbert-macnair

The Glasgow Girls

The Goose Girl by Bessie MacNicol, 1898
The Goose Girl by Bessie MacNicol, 1898

The Glasgow Girls is the name now used for a group of female designers and artists including Margaret and Frances MacDonald, Jessie M. King, Annie French, Helen Paxton Brown, Jessie Wylie Newbery, Ann Macbeth, Bessie MacNicol, Norah Neilson Gray, Stansmore Dean, Eleanor Allen Moore, De Courcy Lewthwaite Dewar, the silversmith Agnes Banks Harvey and Christian Jane Fergusson.

The name “Glasgow Girls” emerged much later. In the 1960s there was an attempt to give due attention to the work of the city’s women artists to balance the plentiful discussion of the Glasgow Boys.

The Glasgow Boys

Their subject matter featured rural, prosaic scenes from in and around Glasgow. Their colorful depictions attempted to capture the many facets of the character of Scotland.

James Guthrie, A Hinds Daughter
James Guthrie, A Hinds Daughter

Image Source: https://gerryco23.wordpress.com/2010/11/17/the-glasgow-boys/

The Glasgow Boys consisted of several men with passion for realism and naturalism. Along with this passion for naturalism, they shared a marked distaste for the Edinburgh oriented Scottish art establishment, which they viewed as oppressive. Driven and motivated by these ideals they embraced change, created masterpieces, and became Scottish icons in the process.

Info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasgow_School#The_Glasgow_Boys

 

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