Deconstructivism (1970s-Today)

Deconstructivism is a postmodern architecture style born in late 1970s, that gives  the impression of the fragmentation of the constructed building. The term refers to ‘Deconstruction’, a form  of  semiotic analysis developed in France by Philosopher Jacques Derrida.

The Ray and Maria Stata Center, in Cambridge, Frank Gehry
The Ray and Maria Stata Center,Cambridge, Frank Gehry

Image source: https://architecture.knoji.com/deconstructivism-a-new-approach-in-twentieth-century-architecture/


 

Deconstructivism- Architecture

Deconstructivist architecture is characterised by surface manipulation, fragmentation, and non-rectilinear shapes which distort and dislocate architectural conventions concerning structure and envelope. It deliberately juxtaposes elements that appear to contradict each other in order to challenge traditional ideas of harmony, continuity and stability.

Info source: http://www.visualartscork.com/architecture/deconstructivism.htm#characteristics

 

Architects

Frank Gehry, in full Frank Owen Gehry (born in 1929) is a Canadian American architect and designer whose original, sculptural, often audacious work won him worldwide renown. In his early work he built unique, quirky structures that emphasized human scale and contextual integrity.

Notable structures from the period include the Vitra Furniture Museum and Factory (1987) in Weil am Rhein, Germany; the American Center (1988–94) in Paris; and the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (1990–93) at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Info source: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Frank-Gehry

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, art museum in Bilbao, Spain. It opened in 1997 as a cooperative venture between the Guggenheim Foundation and the Basque regional administration of northwestern Spain. The museum complex, designed by Frank O. Gehry, consists of interconnected buildings whose extraordinary free-form titanium-sheathed mass suggests a gigantic work of abstract sculpture. The interior space, organized around a large atrium, is mainly devoted to modern and contemporary art, particularly massive sculptures.

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Info and image source: https://www.britannica.com/topic/Guggenheim-Museum-Bilbao

Peter Eisenman (born in 1932) is an american architect, he rose to fame in the late ‘60s, as part of the New York Five, a group that shared an interest in the purity of architectural form and besides Eisenman included Michael Graves, Richard Meier, John Hejduk and Charles Gwathmey.

His most critical works are House VI, the Wexner Center for the Arts, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe and the City of Culture of Galicia.

Info source: http://www.archdaily.com/tag/peter-eisenman/

House VI, or the Frank Residence, is a significant building designed by Peter Eisenman, completed in 1975.  The structure that results is the methodical manipulation of a grid. At first, Eisenman created a form from the intersection of four planes, subsequently manipulating the structures again and again, until coherent spaces began to emerge. The envelope and structure of the building are a manifestation of the changed elements of the original four slabs, with some limited modifications. The purely conceptual design meant that the architecture is strictly plastic, bearing no relationship to construction techniques or purely ornamental form.

House VI or the Frank Residence
House VI or the Frank Residence

Info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_VI

Image source: http://www.archdaily.com/63267/ad-classics-house-vi-peter-eisenman

 

Deconstructivism- Furniture Design

 Easy Edges (1969–73) is the name given to a series of furniture designs by Frank Gehry from 1969 to 1973. After discovering that corrugated cardboard layered enough times in alternate directions builds strength into the piece and make it suitable for the everyday use, Gehry created a series of pieces of furniture such as the “Easy Edges Wiggle Side Chair” that take advantage of the versatility of cardboard as a medium. Hardboard facing is applied to the furniture’s flat surfaces to add to the durability of the designs.

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Image source: http://livanib.weebly.com/architect–frank-o-gehry.html

 

Experimental Edges (1979–82) is a bulkier series of cardboard pieces, featuring rough, shaggy edges and an improvisational appearance. Gehry used thick corrugated cardboard with a pronounced texture to create this furniture’s larger volumes , manipulating their density by combining sheets of varying widths within a single form. Some sheets were intentionally misaligned within the stacks, creating an undulating line and slight ripples.

Info source: http://pastexhibitions.guggenheim.org/gehry/furniture_01.html