Neo-Classic

Neoclassicism took inspiration from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome Architecture, Art and Design. It developed and spread during the end of 18th and the first half of 19th century throughout Europe and Western countries.

L'église Sainte-Marie-Madeleine, neo classical architecture
L’église Sainte-Marie-Madeleine, neo classical architecture

Image source: http://www.historywiz.com/exhibits/neoclassicalarch.html


 

Neo Classicism- Architecture

Neoclassical architecture, revival of Classical architecture during the 18th and early 19th centuries. The movement concerned itself with the logic of entire Classical volume, which tended to reuse Classical parts. Neoclassical architecture is characterized by:

  • grandeur of scale
  • simplicity of geometric forms
  • Greek or Roman detail
  • dramatic use of columns
  • preference for blank walls.

Info source: https://www.britannica.com/art/Neoclassical-architecture

 

The Pantheon, Paris (1756-97) originally built as the Church of Ste-Geneviève, was conceived as a monument to Paris and the French nation as much as it was the church of Paris’s patron saint.

  1. Classical forms, such as the tall Corinthian columns and the dome, were joined with a Gothic type of structure that included the use of concealed flying buttresses and relatively light stone vaulting.
  2. Greek cross in plan (nave, north and south transepts, and choir are of equal dimensions), and originally the walls were pierced with windows in each bay between the columns.

Info source: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/monarchy-enlightenment/neo-classicism/a/soufflot-the-panthon-paris

The Pantheon, Paris (1756-97)
The Pantheon, Paris (1756-97)

Image source: http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/history-of-art/neoclassical-architecture.htm

 

The Brandenburg Gate is an 18th-century neoclassical monument in Berlin, and one of the best-known landmarks of Germany. It is built on the site of a former city gate that marked the start of the road from Berlin to the town of Brandenburg an der Havel.

The Gate was designed by Carl Gotthard Langhans and built between 1788 and 1791. It consists of twelve Doric columns, six to each side, forming five passageways. Citizens originally were allowed to use only the outermost two on each side. Atop the gate is a Quadriga, a chariot drawn by four horses, sculpted by Johann Gottfried Schadow. The new gate was originally named the Peace Gate  and the goddess is Eirene, the goddess of peace.

Info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brandenburg_Gate

Brandenburg Gate
Brandenburg Gate

Image source: http://gogermany.about.com/od/sightsandattractions/a/brandenburggate.htm

 

Neoclassic Interior design

  • Neoclassical furniture tends to be rectangular and lacks curves. Serpentine shapes straightened and cabriole legs evolved into turned or tapered legs. Chair backs were rectangular or oval with turned legs, often fluted in reference to Classical architectural columns.
  • Straight lines, logically ordered, replace the curves and flounces of Rococo furniture.
  • Ornamentation and decoration are sometimes detailed and careful, nearly always abundant.
  • There is much use of painting, inlay, veneer, light carving and relief, and marquetry.
  • Mahogany is the primary wood of choice but some use is also made of satinwood.

Info source: http://www.artnewsnviews.com/view-article.php?article=the-age-of-revivals-neoclassical-furniture&iid=13&articleid=246

Classical Couch, 1805, design by Sheraton.
Classical Couch, 1805, design by Sheraton.
1769, by Sir William Chambers, for serving coffee
1769, by Sir William Chambers, for serving coffee

 

Images source: http://www.furniturestyles.net/european/english/late-georgian.html