Decò Style (1925-1945)

Art Deco took its name from  the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in Paris in 1925. It was an international architectural, artistic and design movement which promoted decoration in addition to bare Functionalism and Rationalism.

Postcard of the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925)
Postcard of the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925)

Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Deco

 

Decò Architecture

One Bunker Hill Art Deco Lobby Interior Design
One Bunker Hill Art Deco Lobby Interior Design

Image Source: http://artdecostyle.ca/art-deco-style-blog/art-deco-architecture

In classic Art Deco, rectangular blocky forms were often arranged in geometric fashion, then broken up by curved ornamental elements. But always the aim was a monolithic appearance with applied decorative motifs.

  • Materials-Art Deco materials included stucco, concrete, smooth-faced stone, and Terracotta. Steel and aluminum were often used along with glass blocks and decorative opaque plate glass (vitrolite).
  • Roof-Art Deco designers adorned flat roofs with parapets, spires, or tower-like constructs to accentuate a corner or entrance. Decorative curiosities such as chimneys were added to further enhance the design.
  • Windows– usually appear as punctured openings, either square or round. To maintain a streamlined appearance for the building, they were often
    Kennedy-Warren Apartments
    Kennedy-Warren Apartments

    arranged in continuous horizontal bands of glass. Wall openings are sometimes filled with decorative glass or with glass blocks, creating a contrast of solid and void forms while admitting daylight. Many large apartment buildings found aesthetic success with decorative embossed spandrel panels placed below windows. The Kennedy-Warren Apartments is an example.

 

Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kennedy-Warren_Apartment_Building

Info source: https://www.wentworthstudio.com/historic-styles/art-deco/

 

Decò Skyscrapers

Margaret Bourke-White, Annie Leibovitz and Robert-Bean on Chrysler Building
Margaret Bourke-White, Annie Leibovitz and Robert-Bean on Chrysler Building

image source: https://ofcourseitsallluck.wordpress.com/tag/margaret-bourke-white/

The Chrysler Building is considered as one of the finest and most recognized buildings in the Big Apple, as well as a classic example of Art Deco architecture. This famous style, which gained international popularity after World War II is a n eclectic combination of craft motifs with imagery and materials inspired by the Machine Age of the industrialization. The style combines bold colours, geometrical shapes and rich ornamentation, which have a direct reference to the embrace of technology that was rapidly changing the culture of the 30s and 40s.

Chrysler Building
Chrysler Building

Image and Info Source: http://www.dyh.com/designspice/the-chrysler-building-an-art-deco-icon-for-85-years/

 

The Chanin Building is a brick and terra-cotta skyscraper in New York City. Built by Irwin S. Chanin in 1927–1929; it was designed by Sloan & Robertson in the Art Deco style.

The base of the building boasts black Belgian marble around the store fronts with a bronze frieze directly above depicting scenes of evolution. A second terra-cotta frieze runs the whole length of the lower facade, presenting a dramatic collection of angular zigzags and curvy leaves. The tower rises 22 stories and then thins into a series of setbacks, reaching a total of 56 floors.

The bronze ornamentation continues in the waves on the floor, mailboxes, and elevator doors extending the general Art Deco style from the outside in.

Info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chanin_Building

Chanin Building, New York City
Chanin Building, New York City

Image source: http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/MID019.htm

Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper in Manhattan, New York City.  Its name derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State; so is an American cultural icon. It is designed in the distinctive Art Deco style.

The Empire State Building was designed by William F. Lamb. The building rises to 1,250 feet high, 1,453 feet high including pinnacle . There are 85 stories of commercial office space. On top of the tower is the pinnacle covered with broadcasting antennas and a lightening rod at the very tip.

The base of the building is approximately two acres in size. The exterior of the structure was built using limestone panels.

Empire State Building, New York
Empire State Building, New York

Image and info source: http://www.designbookmag.com/empirestatebuilding.htm

 

Art Decò Design Style

Art Decò Design Style
Art Decò Design Style

Image Source: http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/MID021.htm

Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann (1879–1933), was a French designer of furniture and interiors of the French Art Deco style of the 1920s. He used only most rare and expensive materials, including ebony, mahogany, rosewood, ambon and other exotic woods, decorated with inlays of ivory, tortoise shell, mother of pearl, little pompoms of silk decorated the handles of drawers of the cabinets. His furniture was based upon 18th century models, but simplified and reshaped. In all of his work, the interior structure of the furniture was completely concealed.

Info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Deco#Furniture

Corner Cabinet, ca. 1923 Brooklyn Museum
Corner Cabinet, ca. 1923 Brooklyn Museum

Image source:  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89mile-Jacques_Ruhlmann

Jules Leleu (1883 –1961) was a French furniture designer. He designed the furniture for the dining room of the Elysee Palace, and for the first-class cabins of the steamship Normandie. His style was characterized by the use of ebony, Macassar wood, walnut, with decoration of plaques of ivory and mother of pearl. He introduced the style of lacquered art deco furniture at the end of in the late 1920s, and in the late 1930s introduced furniture made of metal with panels of smoked glass.

Jules Leleu - Early Art Deco Chairs
Jules Leleu – Early Art Deco Chairs

image source: https://www.1stdibs.com/creators/jules-leleu/furniture/

Deco Style- Painting

Tamara de Lempicka (1895-1980) was a painter of the Art Deco style. Lempicka’s first major exhibition was held in Milan in 1925 sponsored by Count Emmanuele Castelbarco, for which she painted 28 paintings.  She painted her now iconic self portrait Auto-Portrait for the cover of a German fashion magazine.

Auto-Portrait (1925) Private Collection
Tamara de Lempicka, Auto-Portrait (1925) Private Collection

Info and image source: http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/famous-artists/tamara-de-lempicka.htm

 

Striptease at New Gotham (1935)
Striptease at New Gotham (1935)

Reginald Marsh (1898 – 1954) was an American painter. Crowded Coney Island beach scenes, popular entertainments such as vaudeville and burlesque, women, and jobless men on the Bowery are subjects that reappear throughout his work. He painted in egg tempera and in oils, and produced many watercolors, ink and ink wash drawings, and prints.

Image and info source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Marsh_(artist)