Neo Rationalism (1950-Today)

Neo Rationalism was an italian architectural movement, also called Tendenza, developed during the 1950s. It was created by Aldo Rossi and Giorgio Grassi. The style was based on realism and rationalism, rejecting utopian ideas and advocating a return to more historical and classical forms.

Giorgio Grassi, ABB Roland Ernst headquarters, Berlin, Germany 1993
Giorgio Grassi, ABB Roland Ernst headquarters, Berlin, Germany 1993

Image source: https://yokeldesign.wordpress.com/2014/02/18/aldo-rossi-and-neorationalism/

 

Neo Rationalism- Architecture

Aldo Rossi (3 May 1931 – 4 September 1997) was an Italian architect  known for his drawings, urban theory,  which evolved in his book, L’architettura della città (The Architecture of the City).  One of his most famous works is the San Cataldo Cemetery in Modena.

San Cataldo Cemetery, Modena
San Cataldo Cemetery, Modena

San Cataldo Cemetery, Modena– Rossi’s design for the sanctuary of the cemetery, a heavy cube standing on square pillars with raw square windows carved out in symmetrical layers, stripped architecture down to its essence. While in some ways reminiscent of Greek and Renaissance models, it had a severity and total     lack of ornamentation that made it of its time.

Info source: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Aldo-Rossi#ref1118339

Image source: http://www.archdaily.com/95400/ad-classics-san-cataldo-cemetery-aldo-rossi

 

Monte Amiata Housing is a residential complex in the Gallaratese district of Milan, Italy, designed by architects Carlo Aymonino and Aldo Rossi in the late 1960s. It is sometimes referred to as the “Red Dinosaur” in reference both to the reddish color of the buildings and the oddity of their design.

The complex comprises five red buildings: two eight-stories slabs, a long three-stories building, another three-stories slab, and an interconnecting structure; these are grouped around a central area with a yellow, open-air theater, and two smaller triangular plazas. The complexity of the skyline is enriched by a number of passages, decks, elevators, balconies, terraces and bridges connecting the buildings with each other and providing for a great variety of pedestrian walking paths.

The complex was conceived as an utopian micro-city within the city, and based on Aymonino and Rossi’s vision, emphasizing the interplay between housing blocks and their urban context.

Monte Amiata Housing , Gallaratese, Milan
Monte Amiata Housing , Gallaratese, Milan

Image source: http://www.housingprototypes.org/project?File_No=ITA021

 

Giorgio Grassi (born 1935) is one of Italy’s most important modern architects.  Grassi’s architecture is the most severely rational of the group: his extremely formal work is predicated on absolute simplicity, clarity, and honesty without ingratiation, rhetoric, or spectacular shape-making; it refers to historical archetypes of form and space and has a strong concern with the making of urban space. For these reasons Grassi is a non-conformist and a critic of conventional mainstream architecture.

 

Roman Theatre in Sagunto, Spain, 1985-1993
Roman Theatre in Sagunto, Spain, 1985-1993

Reconstruction of the Roman Theatre in Sagunto, Spain, 1985-1993. Roman Theatre is semicircular in shape and can seat 8,000 spectators. The stones of the steps were used to build the castle and some houses. An archaeological museum gathers the objects found at the excavations. The Roman theatre was built w
ithin a dip in the land, which is why its open air concerts have wonderful acoustics. Recently, rehabilitation work has been done to provide a look of unity to the stage and the steps, making conditions adequate for theatre and cultural events.

Info and image source: http://www.spainisculture.com/en/monumentos/valencia/teatro_romano_de_sagunto.html

Carlo Aymonino (1926 –2010) was an Italian architect and urban planner best known for the Monte Amiata housing complex in Milan.