Late Modern (1950-Today)

Late-Modern was the ultimate phase of Modern Design, a phase of contrasts and paradoxes, influenced by technological and social revolutions, rebellion against tradition, mass production and Popular culture, Consumism and Minimalism, Hippie counter culture.

Late modern architecture
Late modern architecture

Image source: http://www.historygraphicdesign.com/the-age-of-information/postmodern-design/526-late-modernism

 

Late Modern Architecture- Characteristics

  • Horizontally oriented
  • Ribbon windows, belt corse
  • Hooded or deep set windows
  • Large areas without windows
  • Use of industrial materials like concrete
  • Dramatic sculptural conception of building’s volumes
  • No ornament
  • Walls eaveless or with boxed or cantilevered eaves
  • Decorative use of functional features
  • Flat and shed roofs

 

Info source: http://www.historicdenver.org/resources/late-modernism/


Gallaratese Quarter II, Aldo Rossi- Construction the first of these communities began in 1946.

Rossi and Aymonino’s utopian urban ideologies coalesced into a complex of five buildings: A1, A2, B, and C were designed by Aymonino, while D was Rossi’s contribution. Inspired by the stepping forms, interior and exterior circulatory paths, and cellular spatial organization of Roman examples like Trajan’s Market, Aymonino incorporated the same features into A1 and A2, the 8-story blocks which form the southern boundary of the site.

All the visible elements of the building are structural, with no ornamentation to distract from the repetition of identical windows and bays which run the full 200 meter (656 foot) length of the block.

Info source: http://www.archdaily.com/867165/ad-classics-gallaratese-quarter-milan-aldo-rossi-carlo-aymonino

Gallaratese Quarter II, Aldo Rossi
Gallaratese Quarter II, Aldo Rossi

Image source: https://www.mimoa.eu/

 

Minimalism Today- House of Stone, Salone del Mobile, Milan

House of Stone, Salone del Mobile, Milan 2010
House of Stone, Salone del Mobile, Milan 2010

British architect John Pawson in collaboration with Salvatori and lighting specialists KKDC exhibited at the celebrated Think Tank Exhibition, Milan.

The installation entitled ‘House of Stone’ was a simple, house shaped architectural structure made from recycled stone, cut with meticulous                                                                                                 accuracy.

KKDC lighting specialists provided a strikingly innovative MoMo LED light source to illuminate the construction at night, turning the cuts into brilliant beams while highlighting the texture of the stone and minimal architecture. The house was made entirely from recycled material made from a stone residue formulated by market leaders Salvatori, consisting of 99% stone scrap and just 1% natural resin to act as a bonding agent.

Info and image source: http://www.e-architect.co.uk/milan/house-stone-milan

Late Modern- Interior design

The furniture industry realized technological advancements in manufacturing techniques. Other changes included an increase in availability of new materials such as aluminum and plastics, as well, designers discovered new ways to bond wood together.

ARNE JACOBSEN
1907 – 1971
Danish architect, his furniture designs have become iconic symbols of the late modern age, specifically the Ant chair and the Egg chair (pictured centre and bottom). However, Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair (pictured top), because of high retail sales, is considered to be one of the most popular chairs ever designed.

Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair
Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair

Image source: https://hivemodern.com/pages/product1590/fritz-hansen-arne-jacobsen-series-7-chair-color

CASTIGLIONI BROTHERS

Industrial designers, the Castiglioni brothers – Achille Castiglioni 1918-2002, Livio Castiglioni 1911-1979, and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni 1913-1968 – created a style that combines a respect for form in everyday objects with a sensible approach to function.
In 1962, during the height of their career, they designed the Arco Floor Lamp (pictured) which was modeled after a typical street light. The lamp’s base was made of marble, heavy enough to project the light source up and out eight feet.

Arc Floor Lamp
Arco Floor Lamp

 

Image source: http://www.regencyshop.com/p245/Arco-Floor-Lamp/product_info.html

Info source: http://livingmodernismstudio.blogspot.it/2012/01/mid-to-late-century-modernism-in.html

 

 

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