Chippendale Style (1750-1780)

The Chippendale Style is named after its creator Thomas Chippendale, who was one of the most-skilled cabinetmakers and designers of the 18th century.

A weathered, outdoor statue of Thomas Chippendale. In the photo his face can be seen and he has long hair with distinct features.
Thomas Chippendale statue in Otley

Image source: https://search.creativecommons.org/photos/85cfb2db-2152-45d7-9edb-5ccb84f8d0bb by Tim Green aka atoach

 About Chippendale

Thomas Chippendale was born in Otley, England to a family of carpenters. Chippendale’s designs were influenced by several styles, such as Rococo, Gothic and chinoiserie. Later, the Neo-classical works of the architect Robert Adam influenced Chippendale. In 1754, he published a book of his designs, “The Gentleman and Cabinet Maker’s Director,” which had great success.

Armchair, After a design by Thomas Chippendale. A dark wood piece with intricate cushion details and elaborate flourishes.
Armchair, created in 1755, design by Thomas Chippendale
Armchair, After a design by Thomas Chippendale (British, baptised Otley, West Yorkshire 1718–1779 London), Mahogany, needlework, British
Close-up photo of the armchair seat
Armchair, After a design by Thomas Chippendale (British, baptised Otley, West Yorkshire 1718–1779 London), Mahogany, needlework, British
Additional close-up photo of the arms of the armchair.
Armchair, After a design by Thomas Chippendale. The back of the chair is seen with a vibrant pink upholstery.
Additional photo of the back of the armchair

Images source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/203747?searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=Thomas+Chippendale&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=2

Along with Thomas Sheraton and George Hepplewhite, he became one of the “big three” English furniture designers of the eighteenth century. After the death of Chippendale in 1779, his son, also named Thomas, carried on his shop.

Plaque to Chippendale’s memory in the place of his birth.

 Image source: https://search.creativecommons.org/photos/4b69ebf3-a3d3-4848-9e51-5ef71bf2026f by michael ely

 About His Work

Chippendale was more than a simple cabinetmaker, as he took control of the interior design production for nobles. While designing a product, he paid attention to the choice of colors, based on the room for which it was intended. Noble families often commissioned Chippendale to make furniture for their mansions.

Library Table, from Chippendale Drawings, Vol. II, Thomas Chippendale.
Library Table, from Chippendale Drawings, Vol. II (1753–62)

Image source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/390597?searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=Thomas+Chippendale&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=14

State Dressing Room, furniture by Chippendale (1771)

Image source: https://search.creativecommons.org/photos/1c523879-26eb-467f-8c82-8bb1ba08f21d by David Dixon

Chippendale Style

Chippendale Style made a school, and the appeal of his designs resurfaced in the second half of the 19th century, with the creation of derivative styles, fused with other styles. The most famous styles include:

  • Gothic Chippendale – recognized with s-shaped curves and pointed arches in the backs of chairs
  • Chinese Chippendale – often included cabinets and shelves featuring pagoda-style pediments arranged in a fretwork design.
Fret, from Chippendale Drawings, Vol. II- ca. 1760–70. Design for a fret with a Greek motif, not published in Thomas Chippendale's 'Gentleman and Cabinet Maker's Director.'
Fret, from Chippendale Drawings, Vol. II (1760–70)

Image source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/390680?searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=Thomas+Chippendale&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=13

 


Info source: https://www.architectureartdesigns.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-chippendale-furniture/

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